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HASTAC – THE LIVING MEDIATIONS: BIOLOGY, TECHNOLOGY, AND ART

17 Kwi

Ciekawa inicjatywa, po zalogowaniu się można brać udział w ciekawych dyskusjach i dzielić się pomysłami. Tutaj toczy się akurat dyskusja na temat związków pomiędzy biologią, technologią i sztuką. Bierze w niej udział wielu ciekawych gości.

First exhibited in Tokyo from 1995-1997, German anatomist Gunther von Hagens’ Body Worlds exhibits have since been shown in over 50 venues throughout Asia, Europe, and North America, making them among the most successful traveling exhibitions ever. Von Hagens, who patented the plastination process used to preserve the bodies in the exhibitions, has commented that Body Worlds has been so popular „because it fills the longing for the authentic in a time of practically unlimited reproducibility.” The exhibits feature plastinated human and sometimes animal bodies and body parts arranged around a central theme – see, for example, the current exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry – and, as such, Von Hagens’s dead bodies highlight the ways in which media and mediation can be brought to bear on the biological.

„Medium” is a fraught word. In media studies, media are traditionally understood as that which transmit and/or store information – technologies such as books, radio, television, computers; in biology, a medium is a surrounding environment in which something functions and thrives – the broth in which E. coli bacteria grows in a laboratory; in art, the medium or media refers to the substance an artist uses to create his or her art – oil paints, marble, ceramics. Von Hagens’s exhibits activate all of these understandings of medium in problematic and interesting ways: Where does von Hagens get the „materials” for his medium of composition? Do dead bodies store and/or transmit information? Do they provide an environment of sorts? How are they, as von Hagens maintains, examples of „authentic” rather than „reproducible” media? In activating these questions, Body Worlds nicely encapsulates the central theme of this forum: the mediation of life, death, and all matter(s) in between.

Much contemporary scholarship is interested in how the biological body, on many scales, becomes a site for political, technological, scientific, and critical engagement. The founding of the Human Genome Project in 1988 marked the life sciences as a major cultural paradigm of the late twentieth century; the first decade of the twenty-first century has continued this proliferation of the biological, initiating the increased funding and visibility of such phenomena as biomedia, biotechnology, bioinformatics, biometrics, and other technological engagements with the biological. The phrase „life itself,” referenced by philosophers like Friedrich Nietzsche, Nikolas Rose, Michel Foucault, and Georges Canguilhem and taken up by many contemporary scholars, is suggestive of both the essence or foundation of the biological (life at its core) and of the ways in which the biological has influenced and infiltrated modes of thought in many other disciplines (from cybernetics to political theory).

Mediation is at the heart of such influence and infiltration, and media studies has taken up this discourse. Emphasizing the ways in which the biological mutates and evolves across various media forms, theories, and contexts and the ways in which media themselves are changed through such transformations, media studies has investigated in recent years certain „biological” phenomena and practices such as media ecologies, outbreak narratives, genetic databases, disease surveillance networks, and entomology.

This forum aims to engage the biological in its many dimensions through the critical lens of media studies while simultaneously examining media through the biological. Our goal is to investigate and interrogate the contemporary understandings of life itself in its widely varied mediated forms. Such interrogation is at once metaphorical (DNA as the code of life, the metaphoricity of science, viral media), rhetorical (the appearance and development of outbreak narratives in films, digital art, and the popular press), and material (disease surveillance networks, media ecologies, forensic media practices).

It is also interdisciplinary in scope; this forum centers on a nexus of two large fields of interest in the humanities: media studies and science and technology studies (STS). From foundational works by Marshall McLuhan and Thomas Kuhn, to more recent work from Friedrich Kittler, Bruno Latour, and Donna Haraway, to the contemporary work of scholars like Lisa Gitelman, Jussi Parikka, Adam Zaretsky, Rob Mitchell, Anne Fausto-Sterling, Priscilla Wald, Sandra Harding and Eugene Thacker, the questions that scholars in these two fields tend to ask can be remarkably similar. By pointing to the ways in which these two large fields have been and can be brought together through the lens of life itself, we hope to emphasize important developments in interdisciplinary humanities scholarship and to create some of our own. We offer some initial questions and objects of inquiry to get everyone thinking and exploring, and we encourage you to add your own thoughts, questions, and examples over the next few weeks:

What does the intersection of media studies and science and technology studies bring to the humanities? What do the humanities do for these disciplines?

What are the roles of media archaeology and/or the history of science and technology in this intersection?

What is „biomedia”? How can we understand life as the transmission and storage of information?

From Bruno Latour’s actor-network theory to embodied experience and distributed cognition, media studies and science and technology studies continue to understand life as extended, networked and connected. How do digital technologies and media change our understandings of life? Of death? Of the neither living nor dead – the viral?

How do networks harness both biology and information technology? How can we understand the movement of viruses (both biological and computational) through networks? How can we understand networks themselves as viral? As living?

What understandings of materiality are at play in the mediation of life itself?

What is the role of the human in these intersections? Of the animal (or insect)? Of the non-living?

How can we incorporate the intersections between media studies and science and technology studies into the classroom? What texts and methodologies should we teach?

Some productions and objects of inquiry include but are not limited to:

Body Worlds
Morbid Anatomy
Biomedicine on Display
The dead media project
Zombie media
Disease Surveillance Networks, like the World Health Organization’s Global Influenza Surveillance Network
Eduardo Kac’s bioart, including „GFP bunny” and „Natural History of the Enigma”
Tissue banks and genetic databases
VASTAL

Please join us! Register at HASTAC and join the conversation.

Many thanks to the guests who will be joining us:
Sarah Franklin (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Colin Milburn (University of California, Davis)
Robert Mitchell (Duke University)
Jussi Parikka (Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge)
Adam Zaretsky (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Hosted by HASTAC Scholars:
Mary Karcher (Wayne State)
Kim Lacey (Wayne State)
Dana Solomon (UC Santa Barbara)
Lindsay Thomas (UC Santa Barbara)

Reklamy

The Exploit A Theory of Networks Alexander R. Galloway and Eugene Thacker

12 Kwi

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The Exploit
A Theory of Networks
Alexander R. Galloway and Eugene Thacker

From P2P protocols to al-Qaeda, a new approach to network culture.

The network has become the core organizational structure for postmodern politics, culture, and life, replacing the modern era’s hierarchical systems. From peer-to-peer file sharing and massive multiplayer online games to contagion vectors of digital or biological viruses and global affiliations of terrorist organizations, the network form has become so invasive that nearly every aspect of contemporary society can be located within it.

Borrowing their title from the hacker term for a program that takes advantage of a flaw in a network system, Alexander R. Galloway and Eugene Thacker challenge the widespread assumption that networks are inherently egalitarian. Instead, they contend that there exist new modes of control entirely native to networks, modes that are at once highly centralized and dispersed, corporate and subversive.

In this provocative book-length essay, Galloway and Thacker argue that a whole new topology must be invented to resist and reshape the network form, one that is as asymmetrical in relationship to networks as the network is in relation to hierarchy.

“The Exploit is that rare thing: a book with a clear grasp of how networks operate that also understands the political implications of this emerging form of power. It cuts through the nonsense about how ‘free’ and ‘democratic’ networks supposedly are, and it offers a rich analysis of how network protocols create a new kind of control. Essential reading for all theorists, artists, activists, techheads, and hackers of the Net.” —McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto

“A rich and provocative text. This book is an invaluable resource for those reconsidering the topicality and viability of artistic practice and artistic subjectivity within contemporary culture.” —Art Journal

Alexander R. Galloway is assistant professor in the Department of Culture and Communication at New York University. He is the author of Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture and Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization.

Eugene Thacker is associate professor of new media in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author of Biomedia and The Global Genome: Biotechnology, Politics, and Culture.

256 pages | 5 3/8 x 8 1/2 | 2007
Electronic Mediations Series, volume 21

TABLE OF CONTENTS

On Reading This Book
Proleogmenon: “We’re Tired of Trees”
A Global Dynamic —Political Atomism—Unilateralism versus Multilateralism—Ubiquity and Universality—Occultism and Cryptography—Networks Fighting Networks—The New Sovereignty

Part I. Nodes
Technology (or Theory)
Theory (or Technology)
Protocol in Computer Networks
Protocol in Biological Networks
An Encoded Life
Toward a Political Ontology of Networks
The Defacement of Enmity
Biopolitics and Protocol
Life-Resistance
The Exploit
Counterprotocol

Part II. Edges
The Datum of Cura I
The Datum of Cura II
Sovereignty and Biology I
Sovereignty and Biology II
Abandoning the Body Politic
The Ghost in the Network
Birth of the Algorithm
Political Animals
Sovereignty and the State of Emergency
Fork Bomb I
Epidemic and Endemic
Network Being
Good Viruses (SimSARS I)
Medical Surveillance (SimSARS II)
Feedback versus Interaction I
Feedback versus Interaction II
Rhetorics of Freedom
A Google Search for My Body
Divine Metabolism
Fork Bomb II
The Paranormal and the Pathological I
The Paranormal and the Pathological II
Universals of Identification
RFC001b: BmTP
Fork Bomb III
Unknown Unknowns
Codification, Not Reification
Tactics of Nonexistence
Disappearance; or, I’ve Seen It All Before
Stop Motion
Pure Metal
The Hypertrophy of Matter
The User and the Programmer
Fork Bomb IV
Interface
There Is No Content
Trash, Junk, Spam

Coda: Bits and Atoms
Appendix: Notes for a Liberated Computer Language
Notes
Index

Derrida On Animals

12 Kwi

Dziękuję @ Olesinskiej!

Wywiad z K. Hayles

8 Kwi

Rita Baum 18 (zima 2011): Transhuman

4 Kwi

Nowy numer Rity Baum – niestety trochę niechlujnie wydany, o ile jestem w stanie zrozumieć, że w pośpiechu nie udało się jego redaktorom przetłumaczyć wszystkich tekstów ( w rezultacie niektóre są po angielsku), to nie jestem w stanie zrozumieć jak można opublikować teksty w połowie przetłumaczone (!).
Numer nierówny – ale kilka tekstów z działu Transhuman godnych polecenia.

TRANSHUMAN:
Alexander R. Galloway, Eugen Thacker, O MIZANTROPII, 3
Konrad Becker, POTĘGA KLASYFIKACJI – KULTURA, KONTEKST, KOMENDA, KONTROLA, KOMUNIKACJA, KOMPUTER, 8
Carlos Katastrofsky, (vir.us.exe), 13
Christiane Paul, SZTUKA CYFROWA/ SZTUKA PUBLICZNA: SPOŁECZNOŚCI SIECIOWE, 14
The Institute for Applied Autonomy (IAA), ENGAGING AMBIVALENCE: INTERVENTIONS IN ENGINEERING CULTURE, 16
Kama Wróbel, ROBAKI W SŁUŻBIE SZTUKI, 19
Anonymus, A LETTER FROM ANONYMUS, 23
Vernor Vinge, OSOBLIWOŚĆ, 25
Ray Kurzweil, PRAWO PRZYSPIESZAJĄCYCH POWROTÓW, 31
Otto Rossler, ENDONOMADOLOGIA, 37
Bruno Marchall, THE UNIVERSAL DOVETAILER ARGUMENT, 41
Ubermorgen, BE SOFT MANIFESTO, 47
Jurgen Schmidhuber, NOWA SZTUCZNA INTELIGENCJA JEST OGÓLNA I MATEMATYCZNIE RYGORYSTYCZNA, 48
Shane Legg Marcus Hutter, DEFINICJE INTELIGENCJI, 53
Robert B. Lisek, KOMBINATORYCZNA INFORMATYKA I NOWA ARCHITEKTURA OGÓLNEJ SZTUCZNEJ INTELIGENCJI, 56
0100101110101101.ORG, RADIOACTIVE SIDE IN THE HEART OF MANCHESTER, 58
Giorgio Agamben, W SPRAWIE BEZPIECZEŃSTWA I TERRORU, 61
McKenzieWark, THE OCCULTED STATE, 62
Bureau of Inverse Technology, ANTITERROR LINE, 66
Geoff Cox & Martin Knahl, KRYTYKA OPRACOWANIA ZABEZPIECZAJĄCEGO, 69
Robert B. Lisek, CRASH [MANIFESTO], 77
Critical Art Ensamble, WHEN THOUGHT BECOMES CRIME, 79
Fundamental Research Lab, SPECTRUM/ DAS GESPENTS. SELF-REPLICATION OF PATHOGEN, 82
Agnieszka Kurant, NIEZNANE NIEZNANE, 85
Przemek(czy Przemysław) Sanecki, PAMFLETY, 89
O NEOPOGAŃSTWIE, z Przemysławem Saneckim rozmawia Emilia Wysocka, 91
Emilia Wysocka, „ART AS INFORMATION ABOUT INFORMATION ABOUT ART” – KONCEPTUALIZM I TECHNOLOGIA, 94
Dominik Podsiadły, NEO-GUERILLA-ART, 98
Marta Heberle, ŻYJ WE MNIE, PRZEŻYJ WE MNIE. CIAŁO JAKO PRZESTRZEŃ DOŚWIADCZANIA INNEGO ORAZ TERYTORIUM PAMIĘCI W PROJEKCIE ART ORIENTE OBJET, 100
Joasia Krysta, SPECTRUM, 103
Riccardo Compa, W STRONĘ POLITYKI TRANSHUMANISTYCZNEJ, 107
Mez Breezz, , 110
Alan Sondheim, (nie wiem, co potraktować jako tytuł, ewentualnie czy zrobić incipit), 111
Michael Basinski, CITY OF WEBS, 113
Marcos Novak, TRANSMITOWANIE ARCHITEKTURY, 116
Monika Wiczewa, WYPADEK LABORATORIUM, 119

SERIA POSTHUMANITIES

4 Kwi

Posthumanities Series
Series editor: Cary Wolfe

An interdisciplinary series that engages the changing shape of the humanities, Posthumanities investigates the many ways that the human has been entangled in complex relations with animals, the environment, and technology for which the theoretical and ethical understandings of humanism are no longer adequate.

Books in the series:

Susan McHugh
Animal Stories
Narrating Across Species Lines
volume 15 | Available May 2011

Dominic Pettman
Human Error
Species-Being and Media Machines
volume 14 | Available May 2011

Thierry Bardini
Junkware
volume 13 | 2011

Jakob von Uexküll
A Foray into the Worlds of Animals and Humans
volume 12 | 2010

Jussi Parikka
Insect Media
volume 11 | 2010

Isabelle Stengers
Cosmopolitics II
volume 10 | Available Spring 2012

Isabelle Stengers
Cosmopolitics I
volume 9 | 2010

Cary Wolfe
What Is Posthumanism?
volume 8 | 2009

John Protevi
Political Affect
Connecting the Social and the Somatic
volume 7 | 2009

Nicole Shukin
Animal Capital
Rendering Life in Biopolitical Times
volume 6 | 2009

David Wills
Dorsality
volume 5 | 2008

Roberto Esposito
Bíos
volume 4 | 2008
Donna J. Haraway
When Species Meet
volume 3 | 2007

Judith Roof
The Poetics of DNA
volume 2 | 2007

Michel Serres
The Parasite
volume 1 | 2007